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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#881 | Posted: 05/07/2019 23:01 | Post subject: Reply with quote
Tha1ChiefRocka wrote:
These two videos of Robert Fripp are essential to understand how complex of a person he is.


Link



Link


Jesus Christ. He loves it to rub in thick. Thank you for giving even me more universal evidence to support my case.
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#882 | Posted: 05/12/2019 15:15 | Post subject: Reply with quote

Warmer by Jeff Tweedy

While I could be talking about any great album that dropped over the weekend like Holly Herndon’s PROTO & Jamila Woods’ amazing LEGACY! LEGACY!, Tweedy’s own Warm was one of last year’s true surprises. Please excuse the disgusting suggestiveness of the end to that last sentence. I think the reason why Warm came as such a shock to me, other than the fact that I had no idea it was coming out, was it sounded like a revitalised Jeff Tweedy. One that possessed an attitude to experiment which felt absent from a good decade of Wilco records. And sure, its companion collection of 10 tracks may not be as lush, compelling, diverse or nuanced, they still serve as a fairly solid reaffirmation of what was previously presented. And most of what it loses in being more straightforward, Warmer gains in its sincerity. The part that sucks most about it is how Tweedy has shot himself in the foot a bit with the handling of its distribution. Though its cracked up to be equally as meaningful as Warm in his eyes, most people haven’t heard it yet since it entered the world as an RSD exclusive and then released exclusively onto the Wilcoworld streaming service. For now at least. I recommend picking it up if you’re a fan and if you can Wink .
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#883 | Posted: 05/14/2019 11:47 | Post subject: Reply with quote
K.D.’s Favourite 5 - King Crimson Edition:

It’s been a long road. A long fucking one... paved with patient waiting for something that started to feel like it was never going to come. Rather like my sex life. Unlike my sex life though, Fripp actually fucking delivered. And just so we’re perfectly and abundantly clear; I have no sexual feelings toward Robert Fripp. Even though recent comments might, frighteningly, dictate otherwise (You and I both know that this is all just a disguise for the fact that you have no game). No, you see, Fripp has been my enemy of sorts for quite some time now. But hey! I said I was going to do this and I’m doing exactly when I said I was going to do it. Well, relatively. Fine, two days late, you got me! Fripp should still take notes. Now as I’m sure some anyone who reads these knows, this is my first one of these in awhile. It’s been an especially regretful time failing to write these over the past couple of months since I promised myself I was going to be more consistent with these. I actually promised myself to attack everything with a more routinist attitude and so far I’m falling pretty short. I mean; don’t we all? Although I’m rather thankful that I decided to shelve that PJ Harvey list I was working on for a little longer. It got super self-deprecating and just generally depressive, would’ve been no fun for anyone. And getting back on topic, I’m glad that Fripp has given me this opportunity actually - probably the only time in this list where I’ll actually saying something positive about the man - because it’s sort of like I get to come back with a vengeance. Sort of. (Ugh. The pretension.) This list came together a lot easier than most others, and that’s got a lot to do with the not so mild contempt I’m harbouring for the guy. I’m just sorry you guys have to watch me to reduce myself to be like the redundant sea of folks who make Floyd comparisons. You think I could bring Soft Machine into the discussion or at least Genesis. Anyway, you know what this is and what a cuck for content I am, so sit back and enjoy the shit-show.

Honourable Mentions:


In The Wake Of Poseidon by King Crimson

Score: 8.3/10
Oh did I forget to mention that I think Robert Fripp is a bit of a pompous cunt? Well yeah fuck that guy. (Oh god, you’re not going to spend this whole thing complaining about how much of a complex prick that you think Robert Fripp may or may not be?) Nah, probably just for this one paragraph. ( Ok, look, I’m gonna level with you; I don’t care -) I know (I really, really don’t care -) kind of seems like whatever you’re about to say next can likely be constituted as caring (but doesn’t that seem like a bit of waste of space to you? Like you already pack enough and over-suffocate them as is but do you really need to spend so many hundred words whining about an already divisive guy? Especially just in the attempt of finding a new bit. I mean the self-aware doesn’t work and you know that but how many times have you forced it now? You’re even doing it again. This isn’t funny, this isn’t even edgy anymore. It’s just what it always has been; a cry for help. A cry for new ideas. Yeah, Fripp’s probably a bit of a dick but why waste time out of everyone’s lives? If there’s anyone even reading this. Also, that too! You always get to say shit like that! There’s probably someone reading this but you’re too insecure to ever admit that your ideas are worth anything. If this is all your are, then so be it. But I think both you and I are both of aware of the fact that it’s not. Why not just be the person you can be, the person you’ve wanting to be for a long time now. Plus where as being insecure ever gotten you anyway? Apart from failure, missed opportunity and self-lament? So give yourself a shot man, you know how great it could be. Or you could just keep up this charade and waste even more of your and everyone else’s time. After all, the ball’s always in your court. That’s what I’ve been so critical of you this whole time.) Uhhh... (c’mon, I know you can do it!) FUCK YOU ROBERT FRIPP FOR MAKING ME WAIT ALL THIS TIME TO LISTEN TO YOUR STUPID DISCOGRAPHY! (Figures. I would say that all I just did was worth a shot but we both know that would be a big fucking lie) Huh? (Nothing. Was it worth the wait?) Still undecided. (Fuck. Fine, you spoilt little shit; thoughts on this album?) Ah, pretty solid and pretty jazzy. I really like “Pictures of The City”, it’s like a soft core Sabbath but by the time it enters its 6th or 7th minute it starts to sound like the band Sabbath wanted to be. Not their best but up there. (I’m never carrying one of these again.) What? (NOTHING!)

Favourite Track: Pictures of The City


Lizard by King Crimson

Score: 8.4/10
Ok, bear with me on this but I think this was a rather predictable move for the band to me. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, it just speaks to the time. I mean just look at what Yes, Jethro Tull or even Floyd were doing the very same year on Atom Mother Heart. That’s not bad crowd to loped in with, especially since they’re about the best Symphonic Prog has to offer. (Yeah I’m not always down with that shit either, it tends to sound outdated.) Well yeah, now wonder. You’re meant to be an extension of me, remember? (True.) But in the defence of 1970’s Lizard, it does manage to distinguish itself by leaning into jazzier accents. More than In The Wake of Poseidon but maybe not as much as 1971’s Islands. The cover of Lizard was real big draw for me initially. You know... apart from it being a King Crimson and it finally being able to be streamed in my country. It reminds of these old copies of C.S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia my Mum used to read to us when my sister & I were younger. Ones she’s kept since she was a kid. Now I don’t know if they were original issues or much less where they are now - and neither would my Mum - but looking at this cover gives me that distinct, nostalgic joy. The same I’m sure most women my age reckon they get from smelling an old book. In spite of that, it’s not all I’m here to discuss. The thing that this album, I personally believe, does best is act as an exhibition for the band’s adept lyricism. It’s pure poetic psychedelia. Passage such as “Grass in your hair stretched like a lion in the sun, restlessly turned moistened your mouth with your tongue” on “Lady of the Dancing Water” or “Night enfolds her cloak of holes around the meadow, old moonlight stalks by broken ploughs hides spokeless wheels in shadow” on “The Battle of Glass Tears” is enough to make a IV era Page & Plant breakdown at the knees and cry. You know... apart from the majestic and profuse folksy soundscapes that act as a foundation behind Pete Sinfield’s words. And yeah, while I’ve seen it being called their best record by any means, my opinion included, Lizard is magisterial in their wider body of work all on its own. From the opening melody of “Crikus” to the expansive grace of the closing title track, and all the way down to pretty much single line muttered sweetly from the legendary mouth of Yes’ John Anderson. Also props to flautist Mel Collins and the rest of the members of the woodwind sections for their contributions; it’s generally hard to sell me on what they’re laying down outside full-bodied jazz, but here they succeeded.

Favourite Track: Lizard


Islands by King Crimson

Score: 8.5/10
It seems rather fitting that we finish up the honourables portion of this list with what I’ve noticed to be somewhat of a sonic trio of records Fripp & co. released post Court of The Crimson King. This is where the jazz side of the band was in full swing - or, you know, at its most prominent - and where its time centre stage would come to climax (still having troubles not thinking dirty thoughts with that word, huh?) before they move onto stranger things with 1973’s Larks’ Tongue In Aspic. It’s hard giving my thoughts on a record like this when I’ve only spent less than a week with it. And that difficulty is arguably greater than any other album that appears on this list purely because this one didn’t strike me in any obvious way after I finished it initially. I know that’s something I should do with every record; give it time before forming any sort of opinion. And I knew it was a strong record, that wasn’t in question, it’s just that I have quite few reasons to believe that this Crimson’s biggest grower. It doesn’t surrender its secrets right away, and that’s for the best. Never jarring or hard to approach, you can just appreciate with multiple sittings. I would say the same thing for Larks’ Tongue In Aspic in all its artistic abundance but that’s where I think they’ve played super smart in how it immediately grabs you. Maybe it’s just my shaky relationship with Symphonic Prog. Nevertheless, I just figured I would be upfront with you all. Yet again losing the rhythm section and a vocalist, Fripp was forced into another stylistic overhaul and reinvention after Lizard. And that’s probably why they have less of a presence on this record than they had prior. Another limitation I feel like this album faced was the fact that Fripp had to teach Boz Burrell how to play the bass guitar throughout the creation process. But in saying that, I can still this among the best of the crop of their albums I’ve heard, even with these blemishes (which are drawbacks which aren’t that big all things considered). And better then two of the others I’ve chosen too, though I know that’s not what an honourable mentions section is meant to be about (well that was ultimately pointless and drawn out). The thing I think I love about this album most though is the immensity and scope of it, especially in comparison to other Crimson records. From soaring orchestration to the spirituality of the horns and brass to the staggering and sometimes bizarre jams that highlight the tales of tragedy and love, often blurring the lines between the two. It’s a universe of monstrous beauty and utter chaos in and of itself.

Favourite Track: Ladies of The Road

#5:

Starless And Bible Black by King Crimson

Score: 8.7/10
(Isn’t this a little pointless? Won’t you be writing about this later with Red?) I see where you’re coming from with the title but it actually has little correlation to that album. Only sharing some of its sonics. But funny enough, I don’t have much to say about this record in particular (Yeah, don’t ask me to play along again). The first thing you need to know about Starless and Black Bible is that it’s not the same Starless that showed up on Red later that year. This one is an instrumental passage this time around. The final track, “Fracture” - like pretty much every album on this list - is secretly the centrepiece of this album. But we’ll get to that a bit later. The albums kicks off with the rapid and revved up insanity of “The Great Deceiver”, everything is operating in overdrive here until the Bass brings it all to a grinding halt in such a fantastic way. It’s kind of ironic that a band could put out a track more schizophrenic than a track they wrote earlier that’s literally called “21st Century Schizoid Man”. “The Great Deceiver” eventually gives way to the slower but just as dense “Lament” with a similar fire in its belly. All the while sounding like a precursor to post-hardcore acts like Fugazi & Unwound, the noisier stylings of Jesus Lizard and the math rock genre as a whole. The subsequent “We’ll Let You Know” can also attest to this. Plus, by now couple of things have been clarified; this is Crimson’s funkiest record and John Wetton kills it on the bass. “The Night Watch” sounds a lot more in line with the sprawled out scapes of 1970’s Lizard more than anything else on this record, and that’s could never be a bad thing. Both “Trio” and “The Mincer” are where things start to get instrumental with their lofty riffs, drony keys and independently thinking drums. Most importantly, they feel like they’re building to something and that’s because they are. Enter now, the titular track which is, like I said, nothing like you’re imaging. At first its a little ominous and minimalist, maybe this is a No Pussyfooting leftover was the thought that initially crossed my mind. The guitars just have that Eno energy and sort of Here Come The Warm Jets quality to them. Though alas, they are two different beasts and that’s for the best because there’s a lot of magical intricacy at play here. And finally, we have “Fracture”. Who’s crazed and immaculately layered instrumentation starts and stops almost like the sweep of the bowls of green valleys to the tops of snowcapped mountains. Even for King Crimson it’s a sight to behold. And that drumming is spot on, almost hip-hop-esque at one point. Sooooo... I think that about covers it and I did say I’d keep this short (knew that was gonna be a lie). Fine, short-er. But I think I did alright, all things considered.

Favourite Track: Fracture

#4:

Discipline by King Crimson

Score: 9.1/10
In the 7 years between 1974’s Red and 1981’s Discipline, Fripp had been collaborating with the likes of Eno on the great No Pussyfooting follow-up, Evening Star - both of which I still can’t fucking listen to down here in the ass end of the world - and focussing on solo career, in and out of The Gentleman. It within the latter two that found himself delve further and further into the divine trappings of post-punk and new wave (F.Y.I. he’s just assuming that from a couple of R.Y.M. genre tags, like his work Eno, he still hasn’t heard those albums). But it’s on Discipline where he gets to bring both the styles of what was established within the parameters of King Crimson as well as his solo career and mix it all together. There was no way you could’ve convinced me prior that would’ve worked and I’m sure if you pitched it to most avid music listeners they’d say the same thing too. Damn it, the cover even fools you into thinking that it’s business as usual, with the medallion or talisman like symbol against the maroon backdrop. You can’t tell that’s not one of the proggiest things you’ve ever seen. Though, as I’m sure that anyone reading this knows (If there is anyone reading this - you know how it goes), Discipline is a prog album like no other. A phrase I know I’m going to use again in some variation at least another two times before this is over. “Elephant Talk” figureheads the album and firmly establishes the new wave and prog bones right away. Now, one of the first things you might be thinking is; is that David Byrne singing? And don’t worry you’re not alone in that thought process, I reckon nearly everyone who I’ve seen has notice me that. While I’d say that wasn’t the intention of Adrian Belew (the vocalist on the record), Robert Fripp or anyone else involved, and just more of a happy accident of working within the style. Speaking of styles, Fripp’s “frippertronics” (still sounds pretentious) - again, I know - are at their most agile here. Not simply opting to play their role in the wider aesthetic or overarching aesthetics but instead elevating the finished product to even greater heights. Regardless whether they’re an overlay or within the organic recording. After “Elephant Talk” comes the showcase of absolute talent “Frame By Frame” and by “Indiscipline”, among other things, Tony Leven has few rivals when it comes to the bass. To break it all down, Discipline is the exact album you don’t expect King Crimson to put, especially following Red, but it remains as further proof that Fripp was beyond his contemporaries. Even when he’d been out of this kind of spotlight and trying new things elsewhere for quite some time by the early eighties. It stands still as not just another mark to his artistry and his expertise but his capacity to shapeshift, maybe more than anything else.

Favourite Track: Frame By Frame

#3:

Larks' Tongues In Aspic by King Crimson

Score: 9.4/10
While Floyd - aye, another one - were making prog rock accessible, Fripp and his forever rotating roster were doing something a little different. Let’s all be honest here, Dark Side of The Moon isn’t some grand experimental masterpiece, I love it to death and I have oodles of nostalgia for it but it’s over mythologised by stoners and middle aged men alike. (Eh. You’re probably going to eat shit for that since it’s still rated as the second best album of all time here, on this site) Yyyyyeeeeaaaahhhhhh, probably. Anyway, if you want me to pull a rabbit out of a hat and give you something that isn’t a carbon copy of every other single entry on this list you probably should’ve cottoned on to the way I work by now. Alright! On with the “review”. The first thing that surprised me about Larks’ Tongue... was the percussion. They made a lot of choices and took a lot of routes I didn’t anticipate. It seems densely packed with interesting hats, captivating chimes and a myriad of other little minimalist flourishes. And rightfully so too, because this serves as their official turnaround from the jazzy scapes that had defined their previous two records, Lizard & Islands toward the avant-garde. Because you know, because the term implies that you do those weird and artsy kinds of things. However, I do think that the most noticeable shift here that would immediately grab most other people’s attention is the shift toward heavier riffs. And yes, while it’s not Red or even Starless and Black Bible, Larks’ Tongue In Aspic holds its own in that department and arguably has a more important place within it than the latter as it acts as the introductory point. Not to knock Starless and Black Bible, I just finished up talking about how I love it. (Even defended it from redundancy too) Thanks. (You’re not going to pull me up on the fact that I’m basically saying you’re right?) Nah. That would be what’s really redundant, especially at the rate I do it (oh). From track one the album beautifully manifest its melodic schizophrenia, jumping in and out of ambience, weighty jazz-fusion and horror-like refrain. Its an ethos carried across the entirety of Larks’ Tongue In Aspic, showing little care for convention and time signature. To be fair, when did they ever? But as an album, Larks Tongue... is art in its purest, unorthodox and most demented forms. An extraordinary fruit cultivated from a one of a kind collaboration of prodigious minds.

Favourite Track: Easy Money

#2:

Red by King Crimson

Score: 9.9/10
1974’s Red is one of those rare breed of albums that really defines how I rate and take apart things. Maybe even more important to my personal metric (”personal” & “metric”... wooooooooww) than an album I actually consider to be flawless. You see, even though I don’t view my opinions as standing for much, there is that one thing I can’t put my finger on as to why I can’t slap a 10 on this record. It’s the same story with Arcade Fire’s Funeral & Built To Spill’s Keep It Like A Secret. It’s not just a weird thing to try and talk about, it’s a little offsetting just to look at. I mean it makes sense numerically, something does have to come before 10 otherwise the whole system falls apart. But it’s like why can’t you make it a 10? What’s stopping you? And again, I can’t tell you that. I adore this album, I absolutely adore Red but no matter how many times I repeat that like a mantra, the end result is still the same. Something sticks out to me but not tangible enough to define (for fuck’s sake, this is excruciating to read). Right from the start, with the opening title track, it’s not hard to admit that Red sounds ahead of its time. And not in the same almost predictive way Court of The Crimson King did 5 years prior. No, a lot of the work the band’s laying down here, especially Fripp on guitar, sounds weirdly more at home 20 years later. While did cover that earlier with Starless and Black Bible but fits in more accurately with Red. Yes the jazz fusions and most of the usual song architecture remained but it’s the album’s heaviness that truly sets it apart. Thanks in no small part to the extensive guitar overlays found all over the record, the most they had ever woven into the fold at that point. It still doesn’t exactly sound like the prog rock of its time, nor its metal counterpart like what Sabbath was doing on Sabbath Bloody Sabbath almost a year earlier. No, this was a breed of prog, one that would than more than just a hand in inspiring the works of the future generations like Porcupine Tree, The Mars Volta, Tool and everything Steven Wilson in general. An album so well crafted, original for its time and monolithic in statue, that it may as well have been designed for cult classic status. Especially given its commercial reception. The worst part is that they’d never truly attack an album with the same mindset or sonics again once Fripp reconvened the outfit. Your best bet for that lies within the man’s solo work and even that can be delightfully deceptive.

Favourite Track: Starless

(Ladies and gentlemen, that song choice is what I like to call a cop out.)

#1:

In The Court Of The Crimson King by King Crimson

Score: 10/10
I mean where do I even fucking start with In The Court of The Crimson King? It’s pretty much a certainty that I’m not going to say something that already hasn’t been said. I know it’s something that’s impossible to avoid and I know I shouldn’t be self-conscious about because it makes my opinions hold less weight but I can’t help. It’s just in my nature. But approaching an album that’s considered such a cultural touchstone as this with that mindset is asking for trouble. Part of me feels like I should be stamping around, red-faced growling about how “Moonchild” ruins the flow of the record and is essentially a prog circle jerk for 12 plus minutes in some contrarian way but that wouldn’t be the truth. And kind of pious since I raved about how much I loved “He Loved Him Madly” and how it was the best part of Davis’ Get Up With It. Plus if you’re not down with lengthy improvisational, free jazz sections, then why the fuck are you listening to King Crimson albums? So yeah, “Moonchild” is fucking amazing and you just need to develop an attention span. Now that the album’s longest track has been dealt with, what about the rest? Well I think my stance on that is pretty obvious too. “21st Century Schizoid Man” is so immense with its guitars like towers or castle spires on fire and twisted vocals that not even Kanye could bring it down. But then again, you know I feel about “POWER” and My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy in general. As an opening statement, it’s perfect. “I Talk To Wind” sounds exactly like that, talking to the wind. It’s the track on the album with the most atmospheres thanks to tantalisingly ponderous plucks, Greg Lake enchanting you with his words and flutes that will have you floating. Again, it’s perfect. Now, I’ve talked about some falls from the cosmos in my time doing these, but none quite match the slow yet breathtaking plummet of “Epitaph”. As a third strike, it’s perfect. And inevitably you come to “The Court of The Crimson King”, and I’d say that’s it’s one of the biggest reasons - if not the biggest reason - why people pick up this album. In fact that it made everything that came after it feel like a little bit of letdown to me in comparison, it’s really that immaculate. And yep, you’re a winner pal because you guessed correctly, it’s perfect. (I mean isn’t that the point of giving something a 10 when you score? You know, to say it’s perfect without actually saying it?) Ok yeah, you’ve got a point. So like Starless and Black Bible to avoid redundancy, I’ll start to wrap it up. Yes, it had a major hand in shifting psychedelia into the realm of the progressive - along with Soft Machine of course (Hey! Look I namedropped them!) - so it could evolve. Through the guiding celestial forces of jazz and classical. Every single person playing an instrument here is a master of their craft, at the absolute pinnacle of their game but especially Ian McDonald on the Mellotron, the all-embracing saxophone and of course, Greg Lake on the mic and Fripp as always. A masterpiece that will seemingly forever remain relevant in history and rightfully so.

But in spite of all that, Fripp’s still a prick.

Favourite Track: The Court of The Crimson King



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dihansse



Gender: Male
Age: 55
Belgium

#884 | Posted: 05/16/2019 19:00 | Post subject: Reply with quote
Hi Komo,

Again a very interesting view on a band that unfortunately is not one of my favorites. I have listened to 8 of their albums (because that's the number of their albums which appear in the overall BEA top 2500) but only liked two of them (and sorry Red is not one of them although from what I read from you I think I'll have to listen to it again) and I agree maybe that's just because I had to listen to them via (s)crappy youtube movies.

So there's two albums left I do like:
I already owned In The Court of The Crimson King and it is certainly a very good album but their album I like the most is...

Discipline: and I suppose it's so much like Talking Heads albums (and on tracks like Thela Hun Ginjeet even more like that collaboration of Byrne with Eno: My Life In The Bush of Ghosts). Since I didn't own this album and also had to revert to those (s)crappy Youtube movies, I'm now relistening to it properly and I still very much like it.

Maybe someday I will do the effort to relisten to some of the others, especially Red.
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#885 | Posted: 05/17/2019 03:54 | Post subject: Reply with quote
dihansse wrote:
Hi Komo,

Again a very interesting view on a band that unfortunately is not one of my favorites. I have listened to 8 of their albums (because that's the number of their albums which appear in the overall BEA top 2500) but only liked two of them (and sorry Red is not one of them although from what I read from you I think I'll have to listen to it again) and I agree maybe that's just because I had to listen to them via (s)crappy youtube movies.

So there's two albums left I do like:
I already owned In The Court of The Crimson King and it is certainly a very good album but their album I like the most is...

Discipline: and I suppose it's so much like Talking Heads albums (and on tracks like Thela Hun Ginjeet even more like that collaboration of Byrne with Eno: My Life In The Bush of Ghosts). Since I didn't own this album and also had to revert to those (s)crappy Youtube movies, I'm now relistening to it properly and I still very much like it.

Maybe someday I will do the effort to relisten to some of the others, especially Red.


Appreciate your words as always di and I know your exact pain all too well. Fripp is just going to Fripp and we’ve got to accept that and thank him for the music or, you know, some sentimental bullshit of that nature. But anyway, I loved what you said about Discipline and you’re right.

I wish I had to contribute more but I just got up to date with Game of Thrones and I, like the majority, feel cheated. Like what even was the point spending all those years with the Lannisters? Like regardless of whether you hate them or not. I mean their parts in the episode were the best acted but it was just over so quickly. Just like that. You could have done the same thing but to such a greater extent in almost hundred different ways. The emotion as it is now just gets completely and literally shortcuted by the immediacy of it. Probably shouldn’t dwell on it too much here but man it fucking sucks.
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#886 | Posted: 05/17/2019 23:24 | Post subject: Reply with quote

Igor by Tyler, The Creator

Best of this Friday. Yep, better than The National & Carly Rae. Still got to check out Injury Reserve’s debut to be fair but Tyler keeps evolving and this more than just some good Synth Funk shit.
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Tilly




Location: Forest Park
United States

#887 | Posted: 05/17/2019 23:37 | Post subject: Reply with quote
Nice reviews of King Crimson!!! Red's my favorite!!!
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#888 | Posted: 05/18/2019 05:10 | Post subject: Reply with quote
Tilly wrote:
Nice reviews of King Crimson!!! Red's my favorite!!!


Cheers bud. I’m still holding out hope that with more listens it’ll be mine too.
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#889 | Posted: 05/18/2019 05:13 | Post subject: Reply with quote
Komorebi-D wrote:

Igor by Tyler, The Creator

Best of this Friday. Yep, better than The National & Carly Rae. Still got to check out Injury Reserve’s debut to be fair but Tyler keeps evolving and this more than just some good Synth Funk shit.


Yeah just finished with Injury Reserve, and while it’ll be this week’s fifth list inclusion, it doesn’t top it. Comes close, albeit, but from Flower Boy to Kali Uchis’ magnificent Isolation and then to this; I’m just in love the trajectory he and the artists around him are on.
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2019: The Special (Not So) Few [RYM]
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Komorebi-D



Gender: Male
Age: 21
Australia

#890 | Posted: 05/18/2019 11:00 | Post subject: Reply with quote

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Let’s talk about this little masterpiece. Now I’ve spoken a little on trajectories today and I think we can all agree that The National have been on a pretty exploratory one, whether you’re down with the electronic route or not. And even if you’re just a casual National fan, you probably would’ve heard something about ”Rylan”. It’s a track that’s origins date back to the High Violet sessions and have been a part of live sets ever since. Apparently it’s the track they could never finish nor thought to attach to a wider record, even with I Am Easy To Find there was vexation. Eventually though they came to a compromise and I’m so incredibly grateful that they did. Every single element just connects in a real roomy way, this especially applies to the drumming which starts and ends the proceedings. It’s weird to think how it all has a lightness to it - and a delightfully peculiar one when it comes to Matt trading off to female vocalists on the second verse - unlike anything The National has ever done before and yet it still rings out on such a sombre note. I guess that just speaks to the energy of the album as a cohesive whole and why this was such a perfect casing for “Rylan” to finally call home. I already love it more than the live version and I think it’s great enough to sit among the band’s true highlights in my eyes. If there’s one reason to pick up I Am Easy To Find, it’s this.

P.S. Does anyone out there think that this album looks and sounds like it would fit better in 2014 too?
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Here's what's I’ve had on heavy rotation this year:

2019: The Special (Not So) Few [RYM]
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