Top 74 Music Albums of the 2000s by DriftingOrpheus (2022)

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1. (=)
I've never found the old saying "Less is more" to be notably applicable when it came to appreciating music. Often, I've been drawn to a sonic strategy that incorporates a great deal of moving parts, riddled with crushing crescendos and soul-shaking moments of softness. After OK Computer, a sector of Radiohead fans were left a bit perplexed with mouths agape, palms firmly upturned to the sky as they found far "less" with 2000's Kid A. They were wrong.

It's true there are a startling lack of traditional instrumentation here, but the band has never upped the ante like this before or since. While the group had previously made stellar, conscious efforts to avoid being pigeonholed, Kid A marked the planting of a flag which flew colors of musical experimentation and encased Radiohead in the annals of music history as they stared down the barrel of studio pressures for a 'conventional' LP. What the band hand-delivered towards the end of 2000, as the shadow of an unfulfilled Y2K dissipated, was their vision of an approaching apocalypse that would be patient in temperament and self-inflicted.

A dystopian, shivering piece of art, depicting a future that has completely gone metallic, Kid A is the brain's answer to OK Computer's heart. It was here where the marriage of the band and synthesizer incorporation was fused as they devised chemical processes like crazed alchemists in order to weld tracks which could survive both boiling heat and glacial cold. The opening tones of Everything in its Right Place encapsulate a sound which would soon serve as an idiosyncratic anthem as Radiohead firmly shook the hand of the 21st century. The skittering, emergency siren of Idioteque snags a snapshot of a world on the brink of collapse, too preoccupied to sense impending armageddon. Finally, the faux comfort of better times evaporates during the final moments of Motion Picture Soundtrack, ending the album with metaphorical hands full of ash.

Radiohead didn't redefine the rock record with Kid A, for there is no all-encompassing definition. What the band truly managed, was the elusive task of redefining themselves, synchronously altering expectations for their subsequent work and thrusting headlong into an unbroken cycle of phoenix-like reincarnation and reinvention bedizened with staggering success.

"Who's in a bunker? Who's in a bunker? I have seen too much. I haven't seen enough."

- Idioteque

Standout Tracks:

1. Idioteque
2. How to Disappear Completely
3. Everything in its Right Place

104.3
[First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2000
Appears in:
Rank Score:
64,268
Rank in 2000:
Rank in 2000s:
Overall Rank:
Average Rating:
Comments:
For many, In Rainbows is the definitive record for the prodigal sons from Abingdon, Oxfordshire. It's certainly the most earthly and naturalistic of the lot. More importantly, it's the most human from a band that's consistently alien. The warm embrace that In Rainbows provides is a welcomed outlier amidst a catalogue fearful of the outside world and entrenched in emotional isolation. On the album, Radiohead don't create panic over climate change like on Kid A. They don't warn of a technology-driven future due to human complacency and they don't protest the political direction of world powers like on Hail to the Thief. They simply reflect, ponder human vanity, recall drunken evenings and most of all, have fun.

The band collectively "letting their hair down" has led to an undeniably earnest entry in the Radiohead canon. Emerging with the bouncy, yet refined 15 Step, it's easy to admire Phil Selway's percussion on the track. The 5/4 time signature creates the illusion of a mutated pop song, awash in sarcastic wit. Bodysnatchers seems to rekindle the band's love for guitar rock as Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien imprint their likenesses all over the thundering track. Nude, track three, could easily take the cake for Radiohead's pinnacle of aesthetic beauty, a song that unfurls slowly and fades into the ether ever so softly. Yorke's vocals on this cut are among the finest he's ever produced. It's very apropos that a song about physical vanity ends up being so tangibly gorgeous.

Late album entries such as Reckoner, Jigsaw Falling Into Place and the heartbreaking Videotape, bookend an album submerged in consistency. Still, there is no grand memorandum, no life-lesson other than what it means to be human, whether fallible, physically self-conscious or devoid of direction. Radiohead have made a name for themselves by zigging and subsequently zagging, but In Rainbows resides on the straightest of lines. A line that is neither accessible nor challenging, existential nor nihilistic. Ten tracks of simply being, at the heights of exuberance and the base of sorrow. A full spectrum of emotion, paralleled by the spectrum of light that dons the album cover.

"No matter what happens now
You shouldn't be afraid
Because I know today has been
The most perfect day I've ever seen."

-Videotape

Standout Tracks:

1. Nude
2. Videotape
3. Jigsaw Falling Into Place

99
[First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2007
Appears in:
Rank Score:
61,489
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In the earliest days of the 21st century, New York City was not only a dominant fulcrum for the arts, it also stood as a mecca for some of the best up-and-coming indie rock artists of the era. Bands such as The Strokes, LCD Soundsystem and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. If these wonderful acts were assembled at a legendary NYC party, deep in the corner, pensively camouflaging would be Interpol. Always tastefully suited and donning black, Interpol were surely the most brooding and moody of these groups and their music brilliantly reflected the sentiment of a city that they loved but was holding them prisoner. Their crowning achievement was 2002's Turn on the Bright Lights, an introspective compendium of social alienation and the poetic juxtaposition of perception and reality in the city they called home.

Lead singer Paul Banks pulls no punches on third track NYC, claiming, "The subway is a porno, The pavements they are a mess, I know you've supported me for a long time, Somehow I'm not impressed". Lead guitarist Daniel Kessler vigorously drives fifth track Say Hello to the Angels. The breakneck pace is notably apt when uncovering the song's inspiration, unfailing sexual yearning during a rocky relationship. Fan favorite Obstacle 1 is often noted as an anthem for the turn-of-the-century indie revival. It was seemingly influenced by the death of a model that willingly pierced her own throat. The relevance to the narrator is still up for interpretation but lines such as, "But it's different now that I'm poor and aging, I'll never see this face again, And you go stabbing yourself in the neck," imply a distant, one-sided affinity. The darkness only purveys further from there. Playfully titled track Stella Was a Diver and She Was Always Down describes another flesh-centric liaison gone awry due to the title bearer's personal instability. Sam Fogarino's burst-guided drumming creates the sensation that the song itself is slowly descending deeper and deeper into the Hudson. Banks croons, "Bottom of the ocean she dwells, bottom of the ocean she dwells", as he too drifts into the abyss.

The lion's share of the band's attention appeared to revolve around their status as dead ringers for legendary post-punk foursome Joy Division. Interpol, while respecting Joy Division's legacy, dismissed the strategic intention of such comparisons, not content to live in another's shadow or (Shadowplay). While The Strokes and LCD Soundsystem concocted hits that were not out of place at Columbia University parties and the sprawling New York City club scene, Turn on the Bright Lights' target was an entirely different audience. A sector of listeners that felt petrified at the notion of being present at a social soiree or those who desired whole-hearted love in favor of booze-soaked escapades. It's a shame that these days Interpol are perceived to have lost their labels as critical darlings, lost to a new generation sporting deaf ears on which the band's music falls on. Shamefully, they often get lost in the shuffle when commenting about the impact of early 2000's indie rock, swiftly swept to the side by more thematically positive acts that potentially have less provocative things to say. How appropriate of the band to be caught up in such a woebegone story. Hindsight suggests that Interpol just may have been the finest act to grace that era. They certainly released its most polished, brilliantly arranged artifact. You can find it gracing the shelves of a Greenwich Village antique shop.

"I had seven faces
Thought I knew which one to wear
But I'm sick of spending these lonely nights
Training myself not to care"

-NYC

Standout Tracks:

1. Obstacle 1
2. Leif Erikson
3. Stella Was a Diver and She Was Always Down

97.8
[First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2002
Appears in:
Rank Score:
17,744
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In 2004, Canadian indie rock pioneers Arcade Fire released Funeral, an album that shook the landscape of the alternative music scene. The album was met with praise from critics and many lauded the band's lyrical and musical flexibility with ingenuity to boot. When production began on a much awaited follow up in 2006, the band affixed two more permanent members into the fold, drummer Jeremy Gara and violinist Sarah Neufeld, expanding their repertoire to an even fuller extent. What they would produce with their newfangled, richer musical density would come to be known as Neon Bible, a record that never ceases to radiate dreaminess, twinkling triumphantly with unbridled grace. More importantly, it serves as the band's most prolific artistic statement, steadfast in its shimmering brilliance.

The first landmark on the album, comes in the form of track four, Intervention. The song stresses the dangers of over-dedication, whether it be towards patriotism while unaware of the prospect of incalculable casualties or towards religious zeal which renders an individual to turn a blind eye to familial strife. Frontman Win Butler declares, "Working for the church while your family dies, you take what they give you and you keep it inside, every spark of friendship and love will die without a home, hear the soldier groan, we'll go at it alone". This coincides with sublime organ pulses that engulf the track in a haze of heavenly aura. Eighth track, (Antichrist Television Blues), finds the band at their most 'Springsteenian' as they conjure a unflinching groove while Butler's lyrics call upon an escape from a dead-end American town and ponder what the future may bring. Penultimate cut No Cars Go is a drum-powered, french influenced rallying cry against the hustle and bustle of modern society. The track swelters to a boiling point of cathartic harmonization, perfectly leading into Butler's subdued first words of My Body is a Cage. The final track illustrates Butler's crippling anxiety until the song erupts in its final moments as he claims "his mind holds the key" to breaking the spell.

Arcade Fire's seminal second LP may not garner the same indie street cred as Funeral, however, it does contain a tighter, more cohesive collection of tracks that are effortlessly dynamic, both in musicality and thematic structure. The addition of a more heavily stocked musical arsenal provided the foundation for the band to push the boundaries of their sonic experimentation. The end result is an album that is less preachy and more introspective, attaching an alluring vulnerability to artists who were extremely conscious of their musical prowess. Plainly, this is not the millenially aware Arcade Fire found on Everything Now, nor is it the Arcade Fire who were undeniably ingenious but marginally conceited on Funeral. Neon Bible features the ensemble at the peak of their powers, embedded with confidence while tastefully unguarded. This is frankly mind-blowing considering that Arcade Fire at their worst is a force to be reckoned with.

"Into the light of a bridge that burns,
As I drive from the city with the money that I earned,
Into the dark of a starless sky,
I'm staring into nothing and I'm asking you why."

-(Antichrist Television Blues)

Standout Tracks:

1. No Cars Go
2. Intervention
3. Ocean of Noise

96.9
[First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2007
Appears in:
Rank Score:
11,743
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The music zeitgeist has seen its fair share of luminous storytellers but few vividly beseech their audience to partake in their free-flowing whimsy like balladeer-extraordinaire Joanna Newsom. Yet, when discussions of this generation's most profound creators, her name seems to reside on the periphery. This is an unspeakable injustice. To call her dexterous would be an understatement, having mastered the piano, harpsichord and the seldom-conquered pedal harp. These instrumental exploits have produced work that's drawn comparisons to the Romantic era, coupled with the singer's unmistakable, naturalistic vocals. Never has Newsom's music sounded more idyllic and enchanting than on 2006's Ys. Named after the mythical French city engulfed by the sea, the album is comprised of five long-form treatises which metaphorically recount four distinct experiences undergone by the harpist in the span of a year. The autobiographical nature of the subject matter enriches the poetry of the record and renders every lyric endlessly interpretable. Newsom's scholarly, fairy-tale epic is equal parts whimsical and irreplicable.

The fantasy-tinged odyssey materializes with opening number, Emily. The song is inspired by Newsom's astrophysicist sister and the revered moments shared between them. As you'd imagine, Joanna's harp is the centerpiece of the sprawling, musing procession. The might of the string section smolders behind her handiwork creating a sensation of perpetual motion that never allows the 12 minute opener to stall but rather to wander with concentrated beauty. Newsom's ability to rhapsodize approaches mythic plateaus on the track as she requests, "Let us go though we know it's a hopeless endeavor; the ties that bind, they are barbed and spined and hold us close forever; though there is nothing would help me come to grips with a sky that is gaping and yawning; there is a song I woke with on my lips as you sailed your great ship towards the morning." It's just one stone that resides within the collection of embarrassing riches of this era's greatest lyricist. Second track, Monkey & Bear, expands the sonic repertoire slightly but the songstress' harp still chaperones. The song flaunts calculated orchestral flutters buoying Newsom's unabridged poetic amendments. The thematic roots of the sweeping nine minute piece are entrenched in the legend of Ursa Major, a constellation in the frame of a bear. Potentially more personally akin to Newsom's experience, the song echoes sentiment of the damning effects staying steadfast in romantic kinship at the cost of surrendering personal independence. "Until we reach the open country, a-steeped in milk and honey; will you keep your fancy clothes on, for me; can you bear a little longer to wear that leash," she details. Album epergne, Sawdust and Diamonds, bears the sweetest of fruits. The track is bolstered by Newsom's sublime harp arpeggio that acts as the engine for the song's excellence. It also ranks as one of the finest lyrical labyrinths of her career. It communicates a moment of adversity between two lovers and ponders if said love will persevere or subside. "And in a moment of almost-unbearable vision, doubled over with the hunger of lions; hold me close, cooed the dove, who was stuffed, now, with sawdust and diamonds," Newsom sings with fragility. It's a harrowing excursion that remains one of the artist's most ethereal yet lucid declarations. Its tendency to induce tears is formidable.

Only Skin, is a serpentine account of the events that befell Joanna during the year that inspired the album and the interrelation between those fragments. The track is Ys' most sonically voluptuous as it features backing vocals from Bill Callahan and burly cello contributions. The tuneful escalation does not supersede Newsom's poetry, however. She protests, "But always up the mountainside you’re clambering, groping blindly, hungry for anything; picking through your pocket linings, well, what is this; scrap of sassafras, eh Sisyphus," as she alludes to a partner's polygamous lust. Only Skin transmutes multiple times throughout its 17 minute runtime, punctuating Newsom's ability as a virtuoso spinner of feminine, fantasy sagas. The album comes to rest with Cosmia, where Joanna calls upon moths to lead her to the warming light of solace. Her vocal work is her mightiest here, as she calls for her "little darling" and how she misses a particular "precious heart". Additionally, the heavenly falsettos she unleashes joyously contrast backing accordion hums. She asks, "Can you hear me; Will you listen; don't come near me; don't go missing, and in the lissome light of evening, help me, Cosmia; I'm grieving."

It's important to step back slightly and gaze at the mountainous mosaic that Newsom has architected. It's tremendously difficult to synthesize one's intimate thoughts into such a boundless tapestry of wordplay and metaphor. On Ys, Joanna Newsom seems to operatively channel her convictions while remaining blissfully, beautifully unfazed by the rigors that would derail mortal songwriters. This is not Newsom's lyrical coming out party as she was profoundly bardic on 2004's The Milk-Eyed Mender, but the poeticism has ballooned into a hulking behemoth on Ys, all the while bending one of the world's most challenging instruments to her will. It's clearly difficult to be humble when describing the young woman's ever-blooming genius. I'll just leave the humility to her as it seems to come her naturally as all things inherently do. With a quartet of albums under her belt, she's likely to have more future triumphs and adornments affixed to her name. Still, she'd be hard-pressed to outdo her chamber folk paragon. It's a carefully constructed journey of enlightening pain and a promise of subsequent emotional provision. It is destined to harbor the necessary magic native to the fantasy settings that which galvanized its creation. Ys is simply a fossilized memento of a forgotten and forlorn age, washed up on a forbidden shore as considerate waves propel it lovingly toward you.

"From the top of the flight,
Of the wide, white stairs,
Through the rest of my life,
Do you wait for me there?"

-Sawdust and Diamonds

Standout Tracks:

1. Sawdust and Diamonds
2. Emily
3. Monkey & Bear

94.9
[First added to this chart: 04/27/2020]
Year of Release:
2006
Appears in:
Rank Score:
10,012
Rank in 2006:
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Overall Rank:
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Comments:
6. (=)
These days, Interpol are a three-piece unit. This is a reality that tends to correlate to their recent dip in critical applause. Their latest two records, El Pintor and Marauder, both feature the absence of longtime bassist Carlos Dengler. Dengler had departed Interpol due to dissension between he and the rest of the band after 2010's self-titled album was released. Despite this change leading to reformed spiritual harmony within the trio, the band lost a sizable fragment of their sonic identity. The ex-bassist's greatest contributions to Interpol come in the form of 2004's sophomore effort, Antics. The record was received favorably by the music press but (ludicrously) didn't obtain the same amount of fanfare as their debut record. Antics is punchier, bleaker and just as addictive as Turn on the Bright Lights. It exhibits an artist unburdened by a gaping hole in their lineup and a quintet feverishly relishing their collective creative prime.

Antics begins by lighting a slow-burning fuse titled Next Exit. A somber, hypnotic opener introducing the listener, reluctantly, to the forthcoming tale of social turbulence. Vocalist Paul Banks remarks, "You've been building up steam, ignited by this fight, so do this thing with me instead of tying on a tight one tonight", calling for bravery in the face of a discouraging, drug-infused descent. The fuse then greets the explosive with second track, Evil. The track is powered by Dengler's intoxicating bassline that cradles the song throughout its duration. The jovial tinge of the track is diversified by Banks' lyrics that conjure the personas of infamous British serial killers Fred and Rosemary West. Spoken from the perspective of the former, Banks chants, "Rosemary, heaven restores you in life, you're coming with me, through the aging, the fearing, the strife." Fourth track, Take You on a Cruise, serves as the centerpiece, fading in slowly like a ship through a dense fog bank. Banks himself has described this as a slight departure from the pathos of the album. He claims, "It has a different tone to the rest of the record for that reason. It’s a tacky seduction story: this guy who may be worldly and well-educated but he’s trying to get laid with a cocktail waitress." The coalescence of the rhythm section in the second half of the track is as majestic as the maritime imagery Banks' poetry frames. This conglomerate plays wonderfully aside Banks chanting, "White Goddess, red Goddess, black Temptress of the sea, you treat me right," calling upon Greek mythology. The finale serves as one of the band's most overlooked cuts. A Time to Be So Small has sonic textures that fashion an appropriate ending for the album with Banks' baritone bathed in reverb as the track floats away. Fogarino's drum hits here have such a fascinating sense of weight that they can be felt within your chest cavity. The song itself is said to be written from the point of view of a crustacean watching a family squabble between a father and son. Go figure. However, aquatic anomaly aside, the lyrics convey a more sinister coloring. The LP ends with Banks proclaiming, "When the cadaverous mob saves its doors for the dead men, you cannot leave," sharpening the threat of death at sea.

Unfortunately for the immensely gifted ensemble, Antics would serve as the band's final full-length classic. Here, the synthesis of emotional tonnage into harmonious elixir is strikingly effortless. Interpol would go on to produce four more above-average, but never legendary albums. As conversed earlier, a portion of it spawned from the crater left by their skillful bass player, but this came long after they'd pumped out their fourth outing. Others would potentially point out that the fracture left behind from the infighting did more damage to the psyche of the band rather than the group's sonic capabilities. Whatever it was, Interpol would never reach these heights again but with that said, not many artists have. A very small sector of the music-making landscape could brandish not one, but two classics to start a recording career. Interpol swam in the deepest of waters with the most fearsome of fauna and emerged remarkably relevant and intact. They've climbed back into their luxury liner with two first-class albums shoveling coal into their furnaces. Interpol has earned the right to go at their own pace now and anything they serve us in the future is a much obliged bonus. The timid, sharply dressed boys from the big city have nothing more to prove.

"If time is my vessel, then learning to love
Might be my way back to sea
The flying, the metal, the turning above
These are just ways to be seen"

-Public Pervert

Standout Tracks:

1. Take You on a Cruise
2. A Time to Be So Small
3. C'mere

94.5
[First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2004
Appears in:
Rank Score:
3,935
Rank in 2004:
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Overall Rank:
Average Rating:
Comments:
93.8 [First added to this chart: 11/01/2021]
Year of Release:
2009
Appears in:
Rank Score:
95
Rank in 2009:
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Average Rating:
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These days, it's hard to quantify what qualifies for a musical experience. The medium is far more effortless to acquire and therefore more digestible. Long gone are the days of purchasing a vinyl record and making a memory out of that process. I am, by no means, a relic of an older, simpler time (despite my pension to purchase countless vinyl pressings). However, I can attest to the communal nature of said activity. Knowing that you have sunk hard earned money into what is essentially a whim or a headed recommendation. There's always inherent risk. Perhaps more interesting, is the communal, even baptismal encounters that arise from listening to an album. A transfiguration of either heart, mind or soul or, if you're lucky, all three simultaneously. Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven is nearly an hour and a half long, consisting of just four tracks that clock in at almost 20 minutes each. It's not digestible, convenient or immediate. It is however, baptismal in the sense that after fighting against its raging waters of spiraling downfall, you emerge altered. It tells us so much without a single lyric by being relentlessly reflective, critical and emotionally arresting. It's a story of epic struggle, triumph and rebirth with no words.

Godspeed You! Black Emperor begins their definitive LP with Storm which appropriately begins as a soft flutter of forming clouds represented by gentile piano and horns. The track then glows with shimmering strings before crashing in with an extensive drum march. It evolves into a kaleidoscopic frenzy of what seems like improvisation before recoiling back into a reserved simmer, giving you time to absorb the grandeur of the previous movement. Don't ponder too long because Storm angers into a tornado fury on the second half of the 22 minute cut. It's powered by bruising drum hits and shrieking guitar that finally relent into a grocery store sample (of all things) before exiting with a sullen, reverbed piano outro. Second track, Static, is less cyclonic but arguably many shades darker. It begins with a drone that wouldn't be out of place on an ambient record before swelling into a sermon delivered by a zealot with strings that can be only described as "weeping". She prophesizes, "Because when you see the face of God, you will die, and there will be nothing left of you, except the God-man, the God-woman, the heavenly man, the heavenly woman, the heavenly child." It's hard to tell if the sample's inclusion is critical of excessive religious fervor or regretful due to a neglect of faith. Perhaps both are fitting. The track then heats to a boil of post-rock rage as guitar and drum motifs, similar to those on Storm, bat the track around with vigor. Static ends with a return to an ambient, metallic hiss not foreign to a horror film soundtrack of the early 2000's.

The third track of the record stands as the valedictorian of the bunch. Sleep starts with a vocal sample credited to Murray Ostril. It typifies the notion, that which impresses our elders holds no significance to this generation. A perpetual trend that is engrained in the human psyche. He mentions Coney Island as if it were the Las Vegas of the East Coast. A rose-colored sentiment of his youth no doubt but this testimony reiterates a baptismal experience of his own, experiencing Coney Island as a child without the collective shrugged shoulders of future generations. He laments, "They called Coney Island the playground of the world. There was no place like it, in the whole world, like Coney Island when I was a youngster. No place in the world like it, and it was so fabulous. Now it's shrunk down to almost nothing, you see." The track swoons with a whirring wail which harnesses into a driving drum locomotive which then quiets minutes later. Sleep then morphs into a twinkling, meditative passage that prioritizes Sophie Trudeau's violin and the drumming twosome of Aidan Girt and Bruce Cawdron. It's the first song on the LP that doesn't end in enveloping quiet but, instead, follows the lead of the percussive duo to lead the track out. Finally, Antennas to Heaven rounds out the album with what can be described as a snippet of bluegrass kicking off the track. Glimmering, child-like piano drifts into a sample of conversing French children before Antennas begins in earnest. It's without hesitation the most thematically positive of the lot, with the first major movement embodying the musical equivalent of the promise of a better future. Antennas then lies in wait for a short period, revisiting the utilization of melancholic piano strikes before familiar, clean drum hits join the fray. It forms a rising tide in the final quest for uplift both spiritually and in musical timbre. It doesn't last forever as the track concludes with icy, anxious noise that challenges any claim that the incorporeal conclusion was a positive one.

Canada's Godspeed You! Black Emperor are no strangers to long-form artistic statements. Their last album effort was 1997's F#A#∞, an album that put them among gloomy, eclectic music's elite. Still, Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven transmits a higher emotional resonance. The music carries in such a way that makes you resign to the idea that it could not be created by anyone else at any other time. This is achieved by sometimes appearing to be improvisational within each of the movements during mammoth tracks, while coinciding with such a technical proficiency that is fine tuned to the note. This gives the album a human unpredictability and allows for surprise each and every time it's listened to. Many could gander at the tracklisting and harbor perceptions of ostentation, however, the album is entrenched in humility with only the sonic prowess perpetuating flair. The humility comes from a place of vulnerability, fallibility and a sense of regret. All of these themes are communicated through wordless, harmonious odysseys that are concurrently nostalgic and worrisome of what the future will hold. Lift Your Skinny Fists Like Antennas to Heaven is a four track triumph of sound and vision that could suffice as a lifetime of work for some artists. It's a clam that harbors a pearl of experience that radiates a different kind of beauty for each and every listener. One that revisits you each and every time you revisit the album.

"And we used to sleep on the beach here,
sleep overnight.
They don't do that anymore.
Things changed...
You see,
They don't sleep anymore on the beach."

-Sleep

Standout Tracks:

1. Sleep
2. Static
3. Antennas to Heaven

93.8
[First added to this chart: 04/27/2020]
Year of Release:
2000
Appears in:
Rank Score:
17,962
Rank in 2000:
Rank in 2000s:
Overall Rank:
Average Rating:
Comments:
93 [First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2001
Appears in:
Rank Score:
14,283
Rank in 2001:
Rank in 2000s:
Overall Rank:
Average Rating:
Comments:
92.9 [First added to this chart: 04/25/2020]
Year of Release:
2008
Appears in:
Rank Score:
8,519
Rank in 2008:
Rank in 2000s:
Overall Rank:
Average Rating:
Comments:
Total albums: 74. Page 1 of 8

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Top 74 Music Albums of the 2000s composition

Year Albums %


2000 6 8%
2001 9 12%
2002 6 8%
2003 7 9%
2004 8 11%
2005 5 7%
2006 6 8%
2007 12 16%
2008 8 11%
2009 7 9%
Artist Albums %


Cancerslug 8 11%
Radiohead 4 5%
The National 4 5%
Blitzkid 4 5%
Animal Collective 3 4%
Interpol 3 4%
Björk 3 4%
Show all
Country Albums %


United States 48 65%
United Kingdom 14 19%
Canada 3 4%
Iceland 3 4%
Mixed Nationality 3 4%
Austria 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Show all

Top 74 Music Albums of the 2000s chart changes

Biggest fallers
Faller Down 1 from 60th to 61st
Five Cellars Below
by Blitzkid
Faller Down 1 from 61st to 62nd
In The Dumpster, Behind The Clinic
by Cancerslug
Faller Down 1 from 62nd to 63rd
Cryptograms
by Deerhunter
New entries
New entryFeels
by Animal Collective

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Top 74 Music Albums of the 2000s ratings

Average Rating: 
88/100 (from 4 votes)
  Ratings distributionRatings distribution Average Rating = (n ÷ (n + m)) × av + (m ÷ (n + m)) × AV
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n = number of ratings an item has currently received.
m = minimum number of ratings required for an item to appear in a 'top-rated' chart (currently 10).
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RatingDate updatedMemberChart ratingsAvg. chart rating
  
90/100
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07/20/2021 15:02 Larcx13  Ratings distributionRatings distribution 78784/100
  
100/100
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04/28/2021 19:07 Rhyner  Ratings distributionRatings distribution 1,34799/100
  
90/100
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03/01/2021 03:31 Exist-en-ciel  Ratings distributionRatings distribution 3,97480/100
  
100/100
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11/04/2020 06:32 DJENNY  Ratings distributionRatings distribution 3,881100/100

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